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Understanding The Link Between Phobias And Fatal Heart Disease

by Medindia Content Team on  February 3, 2005 at 2:59 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
Understanding The Link Between Phobias And  Fatal Heart Disease
Having a phobia may increase ones likelihood of developing fatal heart disease say researchers. A new study shows this is true for women with phobic anxieties including the fear of crowded places, heights or going outside.
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Studies in the past have suggested psychosocial factors such as emotions, anxiety and anger to be associated with an increased risk of fatal heart disease. Studies in men suggest anxiety, specifically phobic anxiety, is related to sudden cardiac death, which is death that occurs within one hour of symptom onset.

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Researchers studied women to determine if there was a relationship similar to that observed in men. In 1988, researchers surveyed more than 70,000 women who had no history of heart disease or phobic anxieties. They set out to uncover any possible phobias the patients had. The women's level of anxiety was classified into four groups of scores from zero to four and higher based on their answers.

The relationship between the score on the phobia index and the subsequent risk of having a heart disease event was analyzed and it was found that women who suffered most from phobic anxiety were those who scored four or greater on the survey and were at a marginally increased risk of dying suddenly from coronary heart disease in general compared to those in the lowest quarter of the population.

Higher scores were associated with an increased risk for sudden cardiac death and fatal heart disease but not non-fatal heart attack. Women with scores greater than four had a 59-percent increased risk of sudden cardiac death and a 31-percent greater risk of fatal coronary heart disease compared to those with a score of zero or one.

Hence researchers conclude that associations between anxiety and other cardiac risk factors might account for some, but not all, of the risks linked to phobic anxiety however they say they are not sure whether phobic anxiety makes women more likely to develop other risk factors for heart disease or whether these risk factors lead to higher levels of phobic anxiety.
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