Medindia

X

Hostility can hurt your heart

by Medindia Content Team on  July 24, 2001 at 11:41 AM General Health News   - G J E 4
Hostility can hurt your heart
Researchers at Ohio State University have found that people who tend to get angry showed an increase in the levels of homocysteine - which is a chemical found in blood and strongly associated with coronary heart disease.
Advertisement

Catherine Stoney, associate professor in the department of psychology and co-author of this study states that it is one possible reason that people with high hostility and anger tend to get heart disease.

Advertisement
The study measured the levels of homocysteine related to behaviour and mood changes.

Homocysteine is a byproduct of animal protein which is broken down in the bloodstream by B comlex vitamins and folate. Elevated levels of this chemical caused damage to the cells lining the walls of the arteries which contributes to its thickening leading to a block.

The study showed that men had higher levels of homocysteine as they show more hostility and anger than women and are at higher risk for heart disease.

Stoney further stated that high-hostile men have a sympathetic nervous system that is always turned on, resulting in higher levels of homocysteine in the blood.
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All