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Patient Pays For The Callousness Of Hospital Administration

by Gopalan on  March 29, 2007 at 12:34 PM AIDS/HIV News   - G J E 4
Patient Pays For The Callousness Of Hospital Administration
A premier Indian medical institution failed to inform the family of a HIV patient that she had tested positive. The girl paid for its callousness, with her life, reports the NDTV, a leading Indian TV channel.
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17-year-old Jyoti, was the daughter of an illiterate three-wheeler driver of New Delhi, India's capital. She was dreaming big. She wanted to become a doctor.

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The All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), a prestigious institution, failed to inform the family of a girl patient that she had tested HIV positive.And she paid the price for their callousness - with her life, reports the NDTV, a leading Indian TV channel.

Jyothi, a 17-year-old girl of New Delhi, India's capital, hailed from a lower middle class family. But she was dreaming big, studying hard to become a doctor.

In November she was admitted to the AIIMS with dengue and Crohn's disease, a severe gastric disorder, often caused by lowered immunity. It was then that the hospital tested her for HIV and discovered that she was positive. Then the tragedy ensued. The hospital authorities did not impress upon Jyothi's family the need to start HIV treatment for their daughter. In fact they failed to pass on the news itself, it turns out. Four months later she returned to the hospital in an advanced condition and died.

The despondent family learnt that the hospital did know in November itself that Jyoti had developed HIV, but withheld the information. They naturally suspected that she contracted it during blood transfusion at the AIIMS. And the TV channel stepped in to investigate.

As it happens, under a protocol of the World Health Organisation (WHO), hospitals cannot directly inform patients that they are HIV positive. Instead the person is asked to meet a doctor face to face who would explain the disease. Apparently Jyothi's family had then been told to collect the blood test report from a doctor, but they failed to. For they did not take it seriously.

There were some written instructions in English too, but none in Jyothi's family could make out what it was all about. They finally learnt she was HIV positive only when she was rushed to the hospital again early March. Now the AIIMS doctors are arguing that Jyothi was the victim of a rare HIV strain that developed slowly. She perhaps contracted the infection when she was two years old and got a blood transfusion at a private clinic in Delhi.

Even if the family had been taken into confidence properly in November last, it would not have meant much, they contend.

More than five million Indians are HIV positive, some estimates say. And a vast proportion of the country's population is poor and unlettered. In such a backdrop, the absence of a proper communication channel between doctors and patients could prove fatal, observers warn.

Source: Medindia
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I cannot say if a doctor was responsible for withholding information in this case or not. Hospitals do make mistakes. One of the biggest mistakes for this young woman was the failure of the hospital and its doctors to use Ozone therapy. Ozone therapy can cure dengue fever as well as HIV when correctly applied. Visit my blog www.HealthSalon.org for further information. Click on the Oxadative Therapies thread.
guest Sunday, April 1, 2007
This kind of episodes always creates great news items for the media. There is more to it in this then meets the eye. HIV is a complex area for counselling more so in a 17 yr old. She was admitted with Dengue previously. Also remember patient's in India do not always follow advise, they tend to listen to eveyone else except the doctor and when things go wrong - the doctors and hospitals are blamed- soft targets. In some instances this maybe right however in most circumstances the fault is with the patient's or their relatives for not reacting to the advise or suggestions. The media twists and turns all these episodes to give out a juicy piece so that they get better eye-balls. Doctors are always easy meat for the media. Beat them when there is an opportunity!!
guest Saturday, March 31, 2007

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