A New Drug for Halting Metastatic Kidney Cancer

by Medindia Content Team on  March 2, 2007 at 7:28 PM Cancer News   - G J E 4
A New Drug for Halting Metastatic Kidney Cancer
To date, the usual treatment for kidney cancer of a metastatic nature has been based solely on immunotherapy.

However, a recent research reports the efficacy of a pharmaceutical drug named Sunitinib in halting the progress of this cancer. In phase III of the research, a comparative study of interferon and sunitinib treatments was done in 750 patients with metastatic kidney cancer. It was found that sunitinib was more efficient in halting the progress of the cancer.

The work was published recently in the prestigious international medical journal, The New England Journal of Medicine and involved medical co-researchers from the Oncology Department of the University Hospital of Navarra, in collaboration with the Clinical Trials Area of the same Department. 101 medical centres from all over the world took part in the research.

Given the short period of follow-up in the research, the effect of the treatment on survival rates could not be corroborated. Although, in general, the treatment is well tolerated, certain side effects can occur and have to be taken into consideration - hypothyroidism, high blood pressure and fatigue.

Metastatic kidney cancer is one of the cancer pathologies the treatment of which has made least progress in recent years. The usual treatment with immunotherapy had not shown clearly positive results in many patients. Sunitinib is one of the few pharmaceutical drugs that provide clear improvements in this type of cancer.

The mechanism of functioning of sunitinib is in blocking the generation of new blood vessels. Tumors, in order to grow, need to develop blood vessels and this pharmaceutical drug impedes their growth, blocking a factor known as VEGF, and other similar ones, which stimulate vascular growth. The use of sunitinib in Spain is to be approved shortly for the treatment of kidney cancer with metastasis although, at the University Hospital, it has been employed with over 40 patients for the last two years, using clinical trials.

Source: Eurekalert

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