Early Breast Cancer Screening may Prove Hazardous

by Medindia Content Team on  December 8, 2006 at 3:55 AM Cancer News
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Early Breast Cancer Screening may Prove Hazardous
Breast cancer screening has proven helpful to abort almost 17% of deaths among breast cancer patients. However researchers opine that such screening unnecessarily exposes an individual to the hazards of radiation.

NHS offers regular screening tests to rule of cancer, for women above the age of 50. Researchers from the Institute for Cancer Research feel that, if the NHS begins the same program for women under the age of 50 as well, it would potentially increase the risk of cancer, from the exposure to harmful radiation. Statistics show that four out of five women who suffer from breast cancer, are usually over the age of 50.Almost 1000 lives are spared from death simply due to timely breast screening interventions.

Institute of Cancer Research had studied over 160,000 women between the ages of 40 and 50, for over a decade. The Lancet published the results of the study. Cancer Research UK also, opined that this study has highlighted that there is no obvious advantage for women between 40 and 50 years to be included in the cancer screening programme under the NHS.

Source: Medindia
MST

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