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Competitive women cyclists experience reduced genital sensation

by Savitha C Muppala on  November 24, 2006 at 11:39 AM Research News   - G J E 4
Competitive women cyclists experience reduced genital sensation
Researchers in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at Yale School of Medicine and The Albert Einstein College of Medicine report that women who are into regular bicycling experienced reduced genital sensation and were more likely to complain of pain in the genitals.
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The researchers undertook a comparative study between 48 women competitive cyclists and 22 women runners. With the help of non-invasive techniques, they studied the possible implication of bicycling on genital sensation and sexual health. Participants in the study were women bicyclists who consistently rode an average of at least 10 miles per week, four weeks per month. Women who ran at least one mile daily or five miles weekly were chosen as a control group because they represent an active group of women who were not exposed to direct pressure in the perineal region.

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"We found that competitive women cyclists have a decrease in genital sensation. However, there were no negative effects on sexual function and quality of life in our young, healthy pre-menopausal study participants," said lead author Marsha K. Guess, M.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Yale.

About 13 million American women bicycle regularly, according to statistics cited in the article. While health benefits of bicycling are many, the activity has also been linked to injuries and fatalities due to motor vehicle collisions, neck and back pain, and chafing, folliculitis, and other ailments that affect both sexes. Past studies, including one authored by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health co-investigator Steve Schrader, have found an association between bicycling and erectile dysfunction and genital numbness in men.

"This is the first study to evaluate the effects of prolonged or frequent bicycling on neurological and sexual function in women," said Guess. "While seated on a bicycle, the external genital nerve and artery are directly compressed. It is possible that chronic compression of the female genital area may lead to compromised blood flow and nerve injury due to disruption of the blood-nerve barrier."

Source: Eurekalert
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