Diabetes Labeled As World's Fifth Killer Disease

by Savitha C Muppala on  November 10, 2006 at 6:17 PM General Health News
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Diabetes Labeled As World's Fifth Killer Disease
High blood sugar is a definitive indication of diabetes. Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health have conducted a study, which has shown that diabetes can kill people much before they are even diagnosed with the disease.
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Danaei and colleagues analyzed data from 52 nations. Their findings have shown that high blood sugar is the cause of an astounding 3,160,000 deaths each year. 'Our results show that one in five deaths from heart disease and one in eight from stroke worldwide are attributable to higher-than-optimum blood [sugar],' Danaei and colleagues conclude.

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The findings which have been published in The Lancet rates high blood sugar among the ranks of other killer causes like smoking, high cholesterol and obesity, and is a major concern in the developing nations, which are highly susceptible to incidence of diabetes.

Source: Medindia
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