NHS Will Do Well to Curb Use Of Umbilical Cord Blood For Treatment of Cancers

by Savitha C Muppala on  October 15, 2006 at 1:57 PM Cancer News   - G J E 4
NHS Will Do Well to Curb Use Of Umbilical Cord Blood For Treatment of Cancers
should discourage commercial banking of umbilical cord blood. On the contrary, women should be motivated to donate to public blood banks without the motive of financial gains.

Umbilical cord blood endowed with stem cells are beneficial in treating diseases like childhood leukemia. Bone marrow which is used for treating such diseases is sometimes replaced with cord blood, which is inexpensive and relatively easy to obtain. Also cord blood is not known to spark off any harmful immune response or rejection in the recipient.

For these reasons interest has been growing in banking cord blood as insurance against future disease, but this has worrying implications for NHS services and little chance of benefit, says Dr Leroy Edozien, a Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at St Mary's Hospital, Manchester.

Cord blood banks generally fall into two groups. Public banks collect cord blood which has been altruistically donated. The blood is used to treat unrelated recipients or is collected from families with a known genetic disease that is treatable by blood stem cell transplantation.

Since 1996, the NHS has been banking donated cord blood through designated public banks run by the National Blood Service and there is universal approval of the storage of this blood.

In contrast, commercial (private) banks operate collection and storage of a baby's cord blood for later use by that person or their siblings should they develop an illness. This 'just-in-case' collection has been criticised by numerous medical bodies and is not recommended.

Scientific arguments against commercial cord blood banking include the chances of the blood being used are very small, the alternatives such as bone marrow, and the speculative claims about how cord blood could be used to treat disease.

But, whatever the scientific merits or demerits, commercial blood banking also raises serious resource, legal, and ethical issues for NHS maternity units, warns the author.

Taking the arguments for and against into consideration, the balance is tilted strongly against NHS trusts collecting cord blood for commercial banking. It should therefore be NHS policy not to facilitate umbilical cord blood collection by its staff, he concludes.

Source: Eurekalert

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