Hormone restrains appetite in man

by Medindia Content Team on  August 12, 2002 at 5:40 PM General Health News
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Hormone restrains appetite in man
According to reasearchers, a hormone is released into the blood after a meal, restrain the appetite if given by injection and might be supportive in treating obesity. The reason for feeling full after a meal, that the intestines release a hormone called PYY3-36 which acts on the brain to produce a feeling of satiety. Researchers at Imperial College, London, now report on the first human trial of PYY3-36.
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10 healthy volunteers received an injection of either PYY3-36 or saline and then, two hours later, were invited to eat at an open buffet. The hormone appeared to decrease appetite, for those receiving it consumed one third fewer calories. The effects lasted for 12 hours after the injection.

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However, regulation of appetite is a complex business involving many other hormones. It's not clear that treatment with PYY3-36 alone would be a solution to obesity. Further research is still on.

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