Parenting skills to manage bad behaviour

by Medindia Content Team on  August 19, 2006 at 10:04 AM Lifestyle News   - G J E 4
Parenting skills to manage bad behaviour
Psychologists at the University of Canberra claim that they may have mastered the art of dealing with bad behaviour of children.

Positive parenting program was developed 2 years ago by a team at the clinical master unit, with an intention to make parenting more pleasant. Minimizing stress and anxiety levels in parents by altering children's behaviour was the aim. Researcher, Penny Sellers, who will develop it further, is assessing this program. According to her, early results reveal that it is working well.

"The anecdotal evidence and feedback I've been getting from parents said they actually do feel much calmer, not so stressed any more and their children are responding really well," she said.

"They've actually seen a reduction in any behavioural problems that they had reported before."

Eating and bad temper are the most common causes of problems for parents.

"There's actually a variety of different strategies that you can use and it's about tailoring the strategy to the family," she said.

"Part of the program is actually identifying what each parent is presenting as a concern or a problem and then figuring out which strategy would work best in their family."

Matt Sanders, professor of psychology at the University of Queensland, sees parenting problems as a public health issue and wants to find ways to extend the reach of his evidence-based positive parenting program, known as Triple P.

"Only 14 per cent of parents in Australia participate in a parenting program," Sanders says. "But to achieve even a 5 per cent reduction in children experiencing behavioural problems, you need to reach about a third of parents."

Sanders is looking for a media that reaches the masses. It could be a TV program, coach-style with a reality flavour, influencing national wellbeing by strengthening parenting skills.

Triple P program is effective when self-administered or delivered in a group. This has been proved by the 29 trials conducted. . "On average, 56 per cent of children move from the clinical range of behavioural problems to the normal range, as a result of parents participating in Triple P," Sanders says.

But what effect does it have when viewed on TV from the comfort of the couch at home?This is yet to be answered.

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Not all kids are same, each poses a different challenge. If the parent knows the right way of dealing with the situation, both the kids and the parents can have peace of mind. The program seems to do excatly the same. For parents with difficult kids, it's a boon.. keep up the good work.
guest Monday, August 21, 2006

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