Proposal to revamp WIC food package

by Medindia Content Team on  August 9, 2006 at 9:23 AM Diet & Nutrition News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

Proposal to revamp WIC food package
Park Ridge: The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has made available a proposal to revamp the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, called the WIC in short. The USDA's proposal will look at reducing the quantity of eggs, milk and juice that form a part of the food packages. The proposal has indicated that the monthly quota for eggs be brought down from two and a half dozen eggs to one dozen for children, pregnant women and partially breastfeeding women and two dozen for fully breastfeeding women.

Based on the proposed rule, the monthly allowance for eggs would be reduced from 2 to 2 1/2 dozen eggs to one dozen for children, pregnant women and partially breastfeeding women, and from 2 to 2 ½ dozen to two dozen for fully breastfeeding women.

"Eggs provide several nutrients, such as protein, iron, folate, and vitamins B6 and B12, which play an important role in the health of the women and children enrolled in WIC," said Donald J. McNamara, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Egg Nutrition Center. "A reduction in eggs would make it more difficult for WIC participants to meet their nutrient needs."

Specifically, eggs are one of the most convenient and economical source of protein. They also provide a type of iron, called heme iron, that is particularly well absorbed by the body. Additionally, eggs are an excellent source of choline, an essential nutrient that has recently been shown to play an important role in infant brain and memory development. Eggs are also widely enjoyed by the culturally-diverse WIC recipients.

Further, dietary cholesterol should not be a nutrition concern for the WIC population of young women and children. The current body of research shows that the 212 mg of cholesterol in a large egg does not contribute to cardiovascular disease risk, since egg intake does not measurably increase the level of small LDL-cholesterol in the blood that is believed to be atherogenic.

(Source: EurekaAlert)

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

Food Additives Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Hunger Fullness and Weight Control Label Lingo on Food Items: Decoded Top Diet Foods that Make you Fat Top Food for Dieters Selenium - Natural Source Better than Supplements 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive