UK Recommendations On Painkillers Flaunted

by Medindia Content Team on  August 6, 2006 at 2:20 PM Drug News   - G J E 4
UK Recommendations On Painkillers Flaunted
A study in Postgraduate Medical Journal says that UK recommendations for the availability of paracetamol, a common painkiller are being flaunted. In September 1998, new legislation was introduced to limit the impact of excess doses of paracetamol, which were responsible for 200 deaths in England and Wales. The drug is highly toxic to the liver in large amounts.

The legislation restricted the size of paracetamol packs available to a maximum of 32 tablets of 500 mg each in pharmacies and to a maximum of 16 tablets in other outlets, such as petrol stations, supermarkets, and corner shops.

The drugs and medical devices watchdog, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, also recommends that only one packet of paracetamol should be sold at a time.

But evidence from the emergency department of an inner city London teaching hospital and information on purchases from pharmacies and other outlets in south London suggests that these recommendations are being contravened.

The researchers questioned 107 people attending one major hospital emergency department for paracetamol poisoning between November 2001 and March 2003 as to how many tablets they had taken, and from where they had obtained them.

In all, 77 of these patients said they had swallowed more than 16 tablets, with 73 patients able to say where they had bought their tablets.

Almost half (35 patients) had deliberately set out to buy paracetamol for an overdose. Sixteen of these patients had managed to buy more than one pack at a time.

One person had bought more than 32 tablets from a pharmacy, and 15 others had bought more than 16 tablets from other outlets.

In 2004, the authors also visited randomly selected pharmacies and other outlets in South London to see how much of the painkiller they would be allowed to buy.

They attempted to buy 64 tablets in one go by taking packs off the shelves, and if not available on display, by simply asking for four packs.

In four of the eight pharmacies they visited, they were able to buy at least 48 tablets in one go.

They also bought more than 16 tablets in four of the six supermarkets, and in nine out of the 10 newsagents, petrol stations, and corner shops, they visited. In all, they were able to purchase at least 48 tablets in nine of the 16 outlets in one go.

The authors point out that their study is small and covers only one area of London, but on the evidence of their research, the recommendations appear to be being contravened. Contact: Emma Dickinson 44-020-738-36529 BMJ Specialty Journals Source: Eurekalert


Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All