Monsoon Related Diseases On The Rise In Mumbai

by Medindia Content Team on  July 22, 2006 at 3:09 PM Tropical Disease News   - G J E 4
Monsoon Related Diseases On The Rise In Mumbai
Reports from the civic hospitals on Friday have indicated that eight more deaths from suspected leptospirosis, dengue, malaria, fever and other rain-related ailments, taking the death toll in the last 48 hours to 21.

Health officials have claimed that additional precautions have been taken in the seven wards most prone to such diseases, including Kurla and parts of Malad. The earlier reports by the BMC had said that there have been 40 deaths from diseases like gastroenteritis, leptospirosis, dengue, malaria, and viral fever, between July 5 and July 20.

The municipal hospitals in Mumbai, had explained that Malaria has been the biggest killer of all. It was also reported that the additional municipal commissioner and a dean of a medical college have both contracted the illness, having since recovered. The health officials have said that the recent heavy rainfall in areas like Parel, Andheri, Borivli, Saki Naka, Jogeshwari, Kurla, and Byculla and the consequent waterlogging have helped these diseases to thrive.

The sources in BMC hospitals had earlier confirmed that over 1,300 patients had been admitted for high fever in the last fortnight. Reports have showed that on last Thursday alone, 401 were admitted to the KEM, Nair, Sion, Cooper, and Bhagwati hospitals. There were also reports of a huge number of cases having been registered in private hospitals.

Jairaj Thanekar, the Executive Health Officer has said that only eight people had died between Wednesday and Thursday. He has however admitted that there have been more than 40 deaths in the last 15 days alone. He explained that malaria and viral fever, were more the cause for concern than the diseases like dengue, leptospirosis. He explained that doctors have already been dispatched to the slum and areas for the collection of samples.

Vijaysinh Patankar, the additional Municipal Commissioner, confirming the number of deaths, has accused the media of blowing the issue out of proportion. He said, "The media needs to be a little careful as Mumbaikars are already scared after the serial blasts. A look at the figures for July over the last five years will tell you that there is not much of a difference. This is a common feature at this time of the year and there is no need to panic."

Patankar further added that nearly 450 teams, each team consisting of two health officials have been treating the suspected cases in these wards in addition to another 900 health officials of the health department. It was reported that the BMC has also placed 162 health posts across the city to provide heath facilities in disease-prone areas.

The civic officials have said that there was no shortage of medicine or leptospirosis, dengue testing kits in civic hospitals. Mangal Mange, chairman, health committee said, "A stock of 300 testing kits is being maintained at all major hospitals. Our doctors are personally taking care of those in need of beds in the hospitals."


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can u suggest someone who can organise a free camp to distribute the medicine for water borne diseases for the welfare.
kandpal1984 Thursday, August 12, 2010
I agree with the last comment. And have to say the media is doing a commendable job of trying to make a difference, create awareness in the Indian society. And they cannot be blamed for doing their job, which even before independent has been just this. Educating the masses! However, I would like to point out. I think a large percent of the blame must come on us as society on the spread of water born disease during the monsoon. How well do we look after our environment? How much do we as individuals value a human life? Can we actually blame the burro crates who we elect in to power despite being unfit to to hold the post they do!.
guest Tuesday, July 25, 2006
It is a shame that the the additional Municipal Commissioner -Vijaysinh Patankar is blaming the media and accusing them of blowing the issue of deaths due to these diseases. These are preventable deaths only if the admin wuld do enough to keep the place clean. What a statement to make "A look at the figures for July over the last five years will tell you that there is not much of a difference. This is a common feature at this time of the year and there is no need to panic.” This means the govt is welll aware that extra precautions are reqd during these months and additional resources needs to be pumped in eradicating the mosquitos etc., But is there nay value for human lkife for these beurocrats one wonders. India's problem is its Govt and it servants!!
guest Sunday, July 23, 2006

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