Misconception on Treatment Options among Prostate Cancer Patients

by Medindia Content Team on  June 26, 2006 at 3:17 PM Cancer News   - G J E 4
Misconception on Treatment Options among Prostate Cancer Patients
According to a new study, men with prostate cancer are more influenced by anecdote, misconception and emotional changes, which prevents them from trusting on clinical trial evidences.

Research showed misconceptions on the disease management options and comparing the anecdotal experiences of others with prostate cancer to their own conditions, eventhough their severity and treatment options were entirely different from them are the reasons for waving decision among patients.

While there are several treatment options for men with localized prostate cancer, clinical trials have failed to demonstrate one optimal therapy. Each treatment option has benefits and its own unique and significant adverse side effects. Radical prostatectomy, for example, has only minimal survival benefits compared to even observation, but is associated with complications, such as impotence and urinary incontinence. With no clear-cut medical guidance, patients must assume a greater role in deciding on treatment in the face of disquieting statistics and risk-benefit information.

To characterize the factors that influence men's treatment decisions, Thomas Denberg, M.D., Ph.D. of the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center and colleagues interviewed 20 men newly diagnosed with localized prostate cancer before and after treatment.

Three factors characterized the patients' decisions: fear and uncertainty; misconceptions about treatment efficacy and risks; and anecdotal information about other's experiences with prostate cancer. Even though most patients knew prostate cancer grows slowly, such 'abstract knowledge did little to dispel the vividly frightening, yet unlikely prospect of prostate cancer suddenly 'blossoming,' the researchers write.

After urologists reviewed the risks and benefits of the treatment options, patients had poor recall of the information they were provided, often confused side effects and treatments, and often said that the side effects had no impact on their treatment decision. Sixteen of 20 men did not intend to seek a second opinion, generally because of misconceptions about its purpose.

Dr. Denberg and his colleagues report that 'this study illustrates that while attention to health information, outcome preferences, and the framing of numerical risk is necessary, it is hardly sufficient for achieving quality in patient-centered decision-making.' It is important to give greater attention to patients' fears, misconceptions, and anecdotal influences.

(Source: Eurekalert)

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All