Wall's To Develop Low-fat Ice-cream Using Fish Blood

by Medindia Content Team on  June 24, 2006 at 10:18 AM Genetics & Stem Cells News   - G J E 4
Wall's To Develop Low-fat Ice-cream Using Fish Blood
Wall's have announced their plans to use a protein that has been originally isolated from fish blood to produce the world's first ice creams using genetically modified technology.

The parent company, Unilever, have claimed that the technique will allow it them to develop ice creams that are of low-calorie, and low fat. They explained that they could be using this technology to make newer versions of their best selling products like the Cornetto, Magnum, and Carte D'Or.

There are debates going on about the GM technology due to an increased desire by consumers for a more natural 'real' food diet, where in artificial additives are removed. But officials at the Unilever believe the benefits of low-fat ice cream could prevail over any doubts about GM.

It was explained that the blood protein is originally extracted from an eel-like ocean pout fish, which uses the protein to survive extreme cold at the bottom of the seas. They stated that the protein has been chemically synthesised and it can be grown in vast vases that can produce a brownish liquid. This liquid, they explained could lower the lowers the temperatures at which ice crystals form and the shape they take up. They claimed that they could then create a stiff and solid mixture by using less cream or fat.

The company has also announced that they have submitted an application with the Food Standard Agency to use the new technology, involving the GM process. Unilever officials have also stated that the process has already been approved in the U.S. and in other parts of the world. They categorically stated that no GM material would remains in the final product, and that the process involving the GM element would be used to only create the protein.

Clare Oxborrow a food campaigner of the Friends of the Earth has said: 'At a time when more and more consumers want to choose unadulterated food, it's disappointing to see Unilever investing in this unnecessary development in overly processed food.'


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