New viewpoint on Hypertension

by Medindia Content Team on  April 6, 2002 at 5:53 PM General Health News
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New viewpoint on Hypertension
According to researchers, a new study shows that the distinction between the two blood pressure figures increases the risk of death in kidney patients. A blood pressure reading always consists of two figures - the systolic reading (top figure) and the diastolic reading (bottom figure). Researchers at University of Texas, now report upon the impact the difference between the two known as pulse pressure has on the outcome for kidney patients.

If you have a blood pressure reading of 140/90, the pulse pressure is 50. Figures greater than 50 are considered high and, according to previous research, may be linked to an increased risk of heart disease. The University of Texas, conducted a study covered over 30,000 patients undergoing dialysis for kidney disease. They measured pulse pressures and correlated this information with which patients died during the following year.

High pulse pressure - rather than high blood pressure itself - turned out to be a risk factor for increased mortality in this group of patients. This finding could affect the way doctors manage high blood pressure focussing not just on the top or bottom figure but on the difference between them.


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