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Number of Children, Teens Being Treated for Mental Disorders is on Rise

by Medindia Content Team on  June 6, 2006 at 4:43 PM Mental Health News   - G J E 4
Number of Children, Teens Being Treated for Mental Disorders is on Rise
According to a report published in the issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, it is disturbing to note that the number of patients, under the age of 20, being treated with antipsychotic medications, is rising steadily.
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Antipsychotics are medications used to treat mental disorders, such as schizophrenia and mania that may involve loss of contact with reality. Several studies have indicated that prescriptions for these medications have been increasing among children and adolescents, raising concerns among professionals and the public. However, no national data have previously been available, according to background information in the article. Most prescriptions given to children and adolescents are for second-generation antipsychotics, which are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for pediatric patients.

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Mark Olfson, M.D., M.P.H., College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, and colleagues analyzed data from a national survey of office-based physicians conducted yearly by federal researchers. In addition to recording whether the child or adolescent patient received a prescription for antipsychotics, the physician or a staff member also logged the patient's age, sex and race or ethnicity; the length of the visit; the physician's specialty and whether the patient received psychotherapy.

The number of outpatient health care visits during which patients between the ages of 0 and 20 years received antipsychotic medications increased six-fold between 1993 and 2002, from a yearly average of 201,000 between 1993 and 1995 to 1,224,000 in 2002. For every 100,000 individuals younger than age 21 in the United States, 274.7 such office visits took place each year from 1993 to 1995, compared with 1,341 each year from 2000 to 2002. Overall, 9.2 percent of mental health visits and 18.3 percent of visits to psychiatrists included antipsychotic treatment. Diagnoses among the patients receiving these medications included disruptive behavior disorder (37.8 percent), mood disorders (31.8 percent), pervasive developmental disorders or mental retardation (17.3 percent) and psychotic disorders (14.2 percent). Male and white youth were most likely to receive such treatments.

The availability of new antipsychotics with fewer side effects in adults may have contributed to the increase. In addition, fewer inpatient care options are available for children with mental illnesses, requiring physicians to treat more seriously ill children in an outpatient setting. These severely ill patients are more likely to require powerful medications like antipsychotics. Although these medications may be safe and effective for some mental disorders in pediatric patients, further research is needed to confirm this and provide detailed information about benefits and risks, the authors write.

'In recent years, second-generation antipsychotic medications have become common in the office-based mental health treatment of young people,' they conclude. 'These medications are used to treat children and adolescents with different mental disorders. Results of clinical trials provide a limited base of support for the short-term safety and efficacy of some second-generation antipsychotic medications for psychosis and disruptive behavior disorders. In light of the widespread and growing use of these medications, there is a pressing need to increase and extend the experimental evaluation of these medications in children and adolescents.'

(Source: Newswise)
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its good.
guest Saturday, July 1, 2006
On pre-emptive anti-psychotic regimen with kids: I took zyprexa which was ineffective for my condition and gave me diabetes. {Only 9 percent of adult Americans think the pharmaceutical industry can be trusted right around the same rating as big tobacco} Zyprexa, which is used for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, accounted for 32% of Eli Lilly's $14.6 billion revenue last year. Zyprexa is the product name for Olanzapine,it is Lilly's top selling drug.It was approved by the FDA in 1996 ,an 'atypical' antipsychotic a newer class of drugs without the motor side effects of the older Thorazine.Zyprexa has been linked to causing diabetes and pancreatitis. Did you know that Lilly made nearly $3 billion last year on diabetic meds, Actos,Humulin and Byetta? Yes! They sell a drug that causes diabetes and then turn a profit on the drugs that treat the condition that they caused in the first place! I was prescribed Zyprexa from 1996 until 2000. In early 2000 i was shocked to have an A1C test result of 13.9 (normal is 4-6) I have no history of diabetes in my family.
guest Tuesday, June 6, 2006

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