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More Benzene In Soft Drinks Pack Carcinogenic Hazard

by Medindia Content Team on  June 3, 2006 at 4:27 PM Diet & Nutrition News   - G J E 4
More Benzene In Soft Drinks Pack Carcinogenic Hazard
John Luik, argued that public should demand that soda companies are adhering to the standard for drinking water regarding benzene. TCS is supported by a small group of sponsors: like the American Beverage Association [and then it lists others such as McDonalds].
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He added that the drinking water standard should apply is not merely my position. Some companies emphasized that they were determined to adhere to quality standards when caught for benzene contamination in bottled drinks in U.K.

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Florida state agency in connection with Mr. Luik claimed about the benzene contamination. He has mistaken that the benzene in Perrier was not due to contamination. It was due to contaminated carbon dioxide that was then passed through the spring water.

Coke, in 1998, explained that the drinks had been contaminated by tainted carbon dioxide. The same problem exists in the fragmented soft drink fountain trade, where non-beverage grade carbon dioxide is often used in dispensing soft drinks. Then tests are being done.

Flavoring water, adding caffeine, phosphoric acid and other deleterious ingredients, does not suddenly make the drinking water standard less than normal.

So the FDA is now doing lab tests regarding contamination from different companies. A principled debate would be focused on which water standard should apply, whether the state standard, the federal standard, or the World Health Organization standard. In the above only Us standard allows benzene-laden products.

Luik questions the Florida alleges that the benzene in their bottled products were found to exceed the five parts per billion limit for U.S. drinking water and thus creates a carcinogenic hazard. So many people are opting for benzene-free soft drinks.

Benzene levels changes with shelf life and exposure to heat and sunlight. So when tests are being done the FDA must have tested products exposed to heat, but unfortunately not.

In 1990, one Pepsi product tested by Cadbury tested at 1 ppb 'off the shelf' and then went to 41.5 ppb after being exposed to heat and light in a weatherometer. Diet Orange Crush tested at 25 ppb 'off the shelf' and then 82 ppb after exposure to heat and light.

Thus it was shocking to knew that many quality bottled drinks used by people all over the world provides low quality products.

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