UNICEF To Help For The Betterment Of Refugee Kids in Chhattisgarh

by Medindia Content Team on  May 4, 2006 at 7:40 PM Indian Health News   - G J E 4
UNICEF To Help For The Betterment Of Refugee Kids in Chhattisgarh
UNICEF has offered to help the children of refugees settled in the makeshift relief camps of the Maoist-hit Dantewada district in the restive eastern state of Chhattisgarh.

UNICEF will specifically look into the health and educational problems of thousands of children settled in these camps.

According to official sources, UNICEF assistance came in when Cecilio Adrona, the organisation's representative in India, met Chhattisgarh chief minister Raman Singh here Monday.

"Adrona, who visited the Maoist-violence hit areas of Bastar region last week, informed Raman Singh that UNICEF was willing to work for better educational and health facilities for thousands of kids residing with their parents in 27 government makeshift relief camps," said a government official.

At least 32,000 people, with an estimated 13,000 children below seven years of age have settled in relief camps in the district since the government launched an armed movement in June last year against outlawed Communist Party of India-Maoist. The rebels had retaliated by targeting local tribals for their alleged support to government.

Officials say that at least 135 persons, mostly tribals, have been killed in the state since January this year owing to spiralling Maoist violence.

Though the government offers free food to all refugees at relief camps, sources reveal that a majority of kids have been facing malnutrition and other serious diseases due to improper health care.

Given UNICEF's expertise in working for educational and health facilities for children in trouble hit areas across the globe, Adrona reportedly told Singh that it would help kids living in relief camps at the Maoist-hit areas.

Raman Singh has approved UNICEF's idea and added the Chhattisgarh government would work in tandem with the organisation for securing the future of thousands kids at the relief camps.

--Edited IANS

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