Supplements may Not Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in the Elderly

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on  March 19, 2014 at 11:34 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Dietary supplements containing omega 3 fatty acids lutein and zeaxanthin did not decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease in the elderly, a new study found.

Author: The writing group for the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) clinical trial.
 Supplements may Not Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in the Elderly
Supplements may Not Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in the Elderly

Background: Diet studies have suggested that increased intake of fish, a source of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids, can reduce rates of cardiac death, death from all other causes and heart attack. However, the evidence that taking dietary supplements containing those fatty acids has been inconsistent and has suggested no reduction in CVD events. Data on the impact of lutein and zeaxanthin (two dietary xanthophylls found in the macula of the human eye) on CVD are not as substantial.

How the Study Was Conducted: Cardiovascular outcomes were studied as part of AREDS2, a clinical trial of supplements and their impact on age-related macular degeneration. As part of the cardiovascular outcomes ancillary study, 4,203 individuals were randomized to take: supplements containing the ω-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid [DHA] and eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] (n=1,068); the macular xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin (n=1,044); a combination of the two (n=1,079); or placebo (1,012). The supplements were added to vitamins and minerals recommended for macular degeneration and given to the participants, who were primarily white, married and highly educated with a median age of 74 years at baseline.

Results: There was no reduction in CVD (heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death) or secondary CVD outcomes (hospitalized heart failure, revascularization or unstable angina) among patients taking the supplements.

Discussion: "We found no significant benefit among older individuals treated with either ω-3 supplements or with a combination of lutein plus zeaxanthin. Our results are consistent with a growing body of evidence from clinical trials that have found little CVD benefit from moderate levels of dietary supplementation."

Source: Eurekalert

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