Study Says Smokers' Brains Biased Against Negative Images Related to Smoking

by Kathy Jones on  March 11, 2014 at 8:28 PM Lifestyle News
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Chronic smokers have altered emotional reactions when they are exposed to negative and positive images associated with tobacco, according to a new study.
 Study Says Smokers' Brains Biased Against Negative Images Related to Smoking
Study Says Smokers' Brains Biased Against Negative Images Related to Smoking

The study conducted by the Institut universitaire en sante mentale de Montreal and Universite de Montreal found that the brains of the smokers were more aroused by images that showed smoking in a positive light than by images that encouraged them to stop.

Williams said that the study found that smokers were also more affected by aversive non-smoking related images than by images of the specific negative consequences of smoking.

Stephane Potvin, co-author of the study, said that their findings show that brain regions associated with motivation are more active in smokers when they see pleasurable images associated with cigarettes and less active when smokers are confronted with the negative effects of smoking.

Source: ANI

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