Study Reports on Common Complications in Diabetics Over 60 Years of Age

by Kathy Jones on  December 10, 2013 at 8:53 PM Diabetes News   - G J E 4
A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine reports that cardiovascular complications and low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, were the common nonfatal complications in adults 60 years of age and older with diabetes.
 Study Reports on Common Complications in Diabetics Over 60 Years of Age
Study Reports on Common Complications in Diabetics Over 60 Years of Age

Nearly half of the 24 million patients with diabetes mellitus in the United States are older than 60 years and that number is expected to double in the next two decades, according to the study background.

Research suggests advancing age and the duration of time a patient has diabetes can predict complication and mortality rates from the disease.

Elbert S. Huang, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Chicago, and colleagues compared rates of diabetes complications and mortality across categories of age and how long a patient had diabetes. The study included 72,310 adults who were 60 years and older, had type 2 diabetes and were enrolled in Kaiser Permanente, a large health care delivery system.

Study findings indicate that among older adults who had diabetes for a shorter duration (9 years or less), nonfatal cardiovascular complications had the highest incidence (coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cerebrovascular disease), followed by diabetic eye disease and acute hypoglycemic events. The incidence of nonfatal complications in older patients with diabetes for a longer duration (10 years or more) was similar, with rates for hypoglycemia similar to those of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease.

The results also indicate that older patients in any age group had higher incidence of all outcomes (nonfatal complications and death) if they had diabetes for a longer, compared with shorter, duration of time.

"This four-year cohort study describes the clinical course of diabetes in older adults. These findings will be relevant and informative for clinicians, researchers and policymakers. … More important, the data from this study may inform the design and scope of public policy interventions that meet the unique needs of elderly patients with the disease," the authors conclude.
(JAMA Intern Med. Published online December 9, 2013. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.12956. Available pre-embargo to the media at

Editor''s Note: This research was funded by grants from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and a University of Chicago John A. Hartford Centers of Excellence Award. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Source: Newswise

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All