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Staying Mentally Active in Older Age Can Play a Role in Staving Off Dementia

by Reshma Anand on  February 25, 2016 at 3:49 PM Senior Health News   - G J E 4
It's better for elderly people to indulge in activities such as crossword puzzles, reading books and chatting with others as it can delay symptoms of Alzheimer's disease though it may not change the disease condition completely, revealed a new study.
Staying Mentally Active in Older Age Can Play a Role in Staving Off Dementia
Staying Mentally Active in Older Age Can Play a Role in Staving Off Dementia
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For people who are carriers of a gene linked to Alzheimer's, the findings differed. People with a gene called APOE4, who had at least 14 years of education and kept mentally active in middle age had lower levels of proteins called amyloid plaques.

‘Keeping the brain active in older age can reduce the risk of dementia in the 20% of individuals who carry the APoE4 gene.’
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The proteins can build up in brain tissue and lead to Alzheimer's disease. People with the gene and a high level of education but did not keep mentally active in middle age had higher levels of amyloid plaques.

"When we looked specifically at the level of lifetime learning, we found that carriers of the APOE4 gene who had higher education and continued to learn through middle age had fewer amyloid deposition on imaging when compared to those who did not continue with intellectual activity in middle age," said study author Prashanthi Vemuri, a Mayo Clinic dementia researcher.

Dr.Vemuri said the overall findings for people who do not carry the gene should not discourage people from exercising and taking part in activities, such as reading books and magazines, playing games and using computers.

"The takeaway message for the general public is that keeping your mind active is very important in delaying symptoms of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr.Vemuri.

For the study, researchers evaluated 393 people without dementia who were part of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Of those, 53 had mild cognitive impairment. All were 70 or older. They were divided into two groups: those with more than 14 years of education and those with less.

Then, researchers used MRI and positron emission tomography scans to look for biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease and questionnaires to evaluate weekly intellectual and physical activity in middle age. The study was published in the Journal Neurology.

Source: Eurekalert
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