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Simple Steps to Help a Grieving Teen

by Sheela Philomena on  August 29, 2014 at 4:54 PM Mental Health News   - G J E 4
Experts have offered five simple tips for parents and other adults to help a grieving teenager.
 Simple Steps to Help a Grieving Teen
Simple Steps to Help a Grieving Teen
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As if adolescence is not difficult enough, a teen's life becomes even more complex when a father, mother or other significant person dies. It's a life-shattering experience faced by one in 10 children before the age of 18. While all young people struggle with such losses, teenagers often have a particularly difficult time adjusting after the death of a loved one.

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Teens often try to mask their grief to avoid appearing vulnerable, especially males who are taught from an early age to hide their emotions. Teens will go to great lengths not to appear different from their peers. On the outside they may act nonchalant, but inside they may feel deep pain, sorrow and fear. Sometimes teens may even take on the role of caregiver to family members or friends, serving only to ignore their own grief.

No matter how hard a parent or another adult tries to reach out, teens often trust only their friends. They believe that only people their age can understand what they are going through and feel more comfortable communicating with people in their own age group.

Because teens are most open to fellow teens, one approach to providing help is through peers. Peer counseling is now an elective course in many schools. Peer counselors are trained to look at life's problems on a personal level and then explore ways to help their peers. These counselors are introduced to difficult situations that may occur in young people's lives, and speakers are brought in to teach them about coping strategies.

Peer counseling can play a critical role in opening communication with bereaved classmates and friends, as well as guiding them to professional help if needed. The young counselors learn the basics about depression, grief, communicating with parents and other adults and about the warning signs of suicide. They also learn their limitations while being assured of the support and expertise of their peer counseling teachers.

• Listen nonjudgmentally and be present;

• Express interest in their views, their ideas and thoughts, and in them;

• Show them that you like and care for them;

• Support their ideas or gently introduce new ways to approach their ideas;

• Acknowledge their grief, as well as your own, and offer your thoughts of how to cope during the grieving process.

Source: Medindia
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