Sensor Systems can Identify Senior Citizens at Risk of Falling Within 3 Weeks

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  August 27, 2016 at 9:34 PM Senior Health News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

Sensors that measure in-home gait speed and stride length can predict likely falls, suggest researchers from the Sinclair School of Nursing and the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri. This technology can assist health providers to detect changes and intervene before a fall occurs within a three-week period.
 Sensor Systems can Identify Senior Citizens at Risk of Falling Within 3 Weeks
Sensor Systems can Identify Senior Citizens at Risk of Falling Within 3 Weeks

Each year, millions of people - especially those 65 and older - fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death.

"We have developed a non-wearable sensor system that can measure walking patterns in the home, including gait speed and stride length," said Marjorie Skubic, director of the MU Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology and professor of electrical and computer engineering. "Assessment of these functions through the use of sensor technology is improving coordinated health care for older adults"

To predict falls, researchers used data collected from sensor systems at TigerPlace, an innovative aging-in-place retirement residence, located in Columbia, Mo. The system generated images and an alert email for nurses indicating when irregular motion was detected. This information could be used to assist nurses in assessing functional decline, providing treatment and preventing falls.

"Aging should not mean that an adult suddenly loses his or her independence," said Marilyn Rantz, Curators' Professor Emerita of Nursing. "However, for many older adults the risk of falling impacts how long seniors can remain independent. Being able to predict that a person is at risk of falling will allow caretakers to intervene with the necessary care to help seniors remain independent as long as possible."

Results from an analysis of the sensor system data found that a gait speed decline of five centimeters per second was associated with an 86.3% probability of falling within the following three weeks. Researchers also found that shortened stride length was associated with a 50.6% probability of falling within the next three weeks.

Additional research led by Rantz and Skubic recently received an award from Mather LifeWays Ū Institute on Aging. Their research has found that by integrating care coordination and sensor technology at TigerPlace, residents are able to live independently on average of four years compared to the national average of 22 months.

"Using embedded sensors in independent living to predict gait changes and falls," recently was published in the Western Journal of Nursing Research. Future research on the sensor systems will focus on how nurses can best use the fall prediction statistics to intervene before the fall occurs.

Source: Eurekalert

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

Senior Health Facts 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive