Research Reveals Sperm Cells are Excellent Swimmers

by Kathy Jones on  May 29, 2014 at 5:24 PM Research News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

A joint study conducted by researchers at University of Cambridge and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reveals that sperm cells are extremely efficient swimmers and are able to swim against the current over long distances in order to reach and fertilize the egg.
 Research Reveals Sperm Cells are Excellent Swimmers
Research Reveals Sperm Cells are Excellent Swimmers

The researchers wanted to find out how the sperm cells managed to navigate over long distances, over 1000 times longer than their own length, and in the right direction. The researchers built a series of micro-channels to mimic the path that the sperm cells take along the fallopian tubes and inserted the sperm cells into these channels. They also modified the speed and flow of the fluid through the tubes and found that the cells were able to swim upstream for several minutes.

"We wanted to know which physical mechanisms could be responsible for navigation. We found that if you create the right flow velocities, you can observe them swimming upstream for several minutes. The mechanism is very robust", lead researcher Dr Jorn Dunkel said.

The study has been published in the journal eLife.


Source: Medindia

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

Genetics of Male Infertility Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Artificial Insemination Varicocele Premature Ejaculation Sex Numbers 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive

Loading...