Public School In Sydney Prohibits Its Students’ Participation In Organ Donation Awareness

by Lakshmi Darshini on  September 3, 2015 at 3:56 PM Organ Donation News
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Public school in Sydney has banned students from participating in an awareness program for organ donation fearing that it might offend religious students.
Public School In Sydney Prohibits Its Students’ Participation In Organ Donation Awareness
Public School In Sydney Prohibits Its Students’ Participation In Organ Donation Awareness

The community members and parents were hoping that Kellyville Public School will take part in the inaugural Jersey Day. During this day, the participants will dress in their favorite sporting team's jersey in a bid to start a conversation about the life-saving potential of organ donation.

But the school's relieving principal Petra Hocking after consulting with the school's executive body wrote to parents and ruled out participation in Jersey Day, judging that the children are too young to understand and comprehend such issues and fears it might offend religious minorities.

"We do not feel that this is a topic normally suited to younger students and we are also aware we need to respect cultural differences and religious beliefs amongst our school community,'' the letter said.

An NSW Department of Education spokesperson said it was up to individual schools to determine whether to participate in Jersey Day, adding that Kellyville Public's primary concern was age based.

"Participation in Jersey Day is a matter for individual schools. Kellyville Public School made the decision not to participate in Jersey Day due to the sensitivity of discussing organ donation with young children,'' the spokesman said.

Such a message was not only an important issue, but deeply relevant for the parents. Three months ago, teenager from Hills Shire, Nathan Gremmo gave the gift of life to others when he lost his own in a car accident. Twenty five schools in the Hills Shire are participating in Jersey Day, including eight public schools and two kindergartens.

In the letter to parents of Kellyville Public School students, Ms Hocking begins by recounting the tragic accident that claimed Nathan's life. "I'm sure that many of you will remember the terrible accident in May when young Nathan Gremmo from the Hills district tragically lost his life,'' Ms Hocking wrote.

"Nathan's family courageously chose to give the gift of life to honour Nathan. Over the past couple of weeks (one teacher) and I have been approached by members of the community to participate in Jersey Day, to honour Nathan and to discuss organ donation with students."

"The executive staff has discussed this in (sic) length and we've decided not to participate in this day. Our reason for this is the fact we strongly feel this is an extremely sensitive issue and a very personal one for families to discuss with their children at an age they feel is appropriate."

"We do not feel that this is a topic normally suited to younger students and we are also aware we need to respect cultural differences and religious beliefs amongst our school community,'' the letter said.

Source: Medindia

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