Project to Control Non-communicable Diseases to be Launched in Dakshina Kannada, Karnataka

by Shirley Johanna on  September 25, 2015 at 12:28 PM Indian Health News
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A World Bank-funded pilot project to control non-communicable diseases (NCD's) such as diabetes, hypertension and cancer in Dakshina Kannada and Davangere districts in Karnataka will be launched on October 7, said Health and Family Welfare Minister UT Khader.
Project to Control Non-communicable Diseases to be Launched in Dakshina Kannada, Karnataka
Project to Control Non-communicable Diseases to be Launched in Dakshina Kannada, Karnataka

Khader said that under this project, any person suspected of having NCD's could approach the nearest primary health center (PHC) or government hospital. Patients would be examined and given medicines for free.

Trained nurses would be appointed on contract basis for examining patients in the two districts.

About Rs 2 lakh would be spent each year per each PHC and the hospital under the project. Rs 1 lakh would be for salary and the remaining amount would be for medicines, said Khader.

The project will continue till March 2016, after which the the government would decide whether to extend the scheme to other districts or not.

The pilot project would be launched at a function at T.M.A. Pai International Convention Centre on October 7.

This pilot project would be in force till March 2016, after which a decision would be taken whether to extend the scheme to other districts or not. The project would be launched at a function at T.M.A. Pai International Convention Centre here on October 7.

Khader also added that the Union government's Mission Indradhanush scheme for vaccination of children and pregnant women would be extended to to Dakshina Kannada, Udupi and 15 other districts in the State from October 7.

"Children aged up to two years and their mothers would be vaccinated against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, measles, Hepatitis B, Hemophilus Influenza type B and Japanese Encephalitis. Hence, efforts were being made to close immunity gaps and strengthen immunization coverage," said Khader.

Source: Medindia

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