Medindia

X

Particular Neuronal Response To Junk Food When Sleep-Restricted Exposed by Brain Scans

by Nancy Needhima on  June 13, 2012 at 1:51 PM Research News   - G J E 4
During a phase of sleep restriction the sight of unhealthy food triggered reward centres in the brain that were less active when participants had sufficient sleep, states a new study with means of brain scans to better know the relation between sleep restriction and obesity.
Particular Neuronal Response To Junk Food When Sleep-Restricted Exposed by Brain Scans
Particular Neuronal Response To Junk Food When Sleep-Restricted Exposed by Brain Scans
Advertisement

Researchers from St. Luke's - Roosevelt Hospital Center and Columbia University in New York performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 25 men and women of normal weights while they looked at images of healthy and unhealthy foods. The scans were taken after five nights in which sleep was either restricted to four hours or allowed to continue up to nine hours. Results were compared.

Advertisement
"The same brain regions activated when unhealthy foods were presented were not involved when we presented healthy foods," said Marie-Pierre St-Onge, PhD, the study's principal investigator. "The unhealthy food response was a neuronal pattern specific to restricted sleep. This may suggest greater propensity to succumb to unhealthy foods when one is sleep restricted."

Previous research has shown that restricted sleep leads to increased food consumption in healthy people, and that a self-reported desire for sweet and salty food increases after a period of sleep deprivation. St-Onge said the new study's results provide additional support for a role of short sleep in appetite-modulation and obesity.

"The results suggest that, under restricted sleep, individuals will find unhealthy foods highly salient and rewarding, which may lead to greater consumption of those foods," St-Onge said. "Indeed, food intake data from this same study showed that participants ate more overall and consumed more fat after a period of sleep restriction compared to regular sleep. The brain imaging data provided the neurocognitive basis for those results."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All