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Novel Device Detects Harmful Bacteria and Suggests Apt Antibiotic

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  October 6, 2016 at 11:05 PM Research News   - G J E 4
A device that can rapidly identify harmful bacteria and can determine whether it is resistant to antibiotics has been invented by an interdisciplinary team of engineers and pharmaceutical researchers at the University of Alberta.
 Novel Device Detects Harmful Bacteria and Suggests Apt Antibiotic
Novel Device Detects Harmful Bacteria and Suggests Apt Antibiotic
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The device could save precious hours in patient care and public health, and prevent the spread of drug-resistant strains of bacteria. The team's findings can help in detecting bacteria and measure their susceptibility to antibiotics in small confined volumes.

‘A device that can rapidly identify harmful bacteria and can determine whether it is resistant to antibiotics has been invented by researchers.’
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The device was designed to look for and trap different types of bacteria and find out which antibiotics are most effective against them. Rather than growing bacterial cultures then testing them, the microscopic device relies on nano-scale technology for fast results.

The main feature of the device is a cantilever, a plank that resembles a diving board that has a microfluidic channel 25 times smaller than the width of a hair etched on its surface. The channel is coated with biomaterials, like antibodies, that harmful bacteria like E. coli or Listeria in fluid samples stick to. When bacteria are caught, the device sends out three different signals to the researchers. When bacteria is detected the cantilever's mass changes, and it bends, explained researcher Thomas Thundat.

"So, this gives us two signals: the mass change and the bending action by shining infrared light on the bacteria, a third signal is sent, he added. If the bacterial absorbs the light it begins to vibrate, generating a minute amount of heat that sends a confirmation signal. Having three detection methods means there is no ambiguity, he said.

"By monitoring the interaction of light and bacteria, we can get highly selective detection of bacteria," said Faheem Khan, another expert. With the bacteria trapped in the cantilever, different antibiotic drugs can be added to the device. Changes in the intensity of tiny oscillations of the cantilever signal will inform the researchers whether the bacteria are alive or dead. The researchers then know which antibiotics the bacteria are susceptible to.

"We're trying to find a way to fight bacterial resistance to drugs and prevent or at least decrease the spread of drug-resistant strains," said Hashem Etayash, a researcher. Adding, "We're able to do several tests in a very short period of time and we can quickly identify bugs that can resist antibiotics."

The device can be used to test extremely small fluid samples, millions of times smaller than a rain droplet. The size of the device is advantageous when you only want a very small sample, in settings such as a neonatal intensive care unit, or in situations where only very small samples are available.

The research was published in Nature Communications journal.

Source: ANI
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