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New Methods Discovered to Detect Invasive Species in Water Bodies

by Bidita Debnath on  April 1, 2013 at 9:51 PM Research News   - G J E 4
A study reveals that scientists have combined two new technologies to create a unique surveillance tool that could track and detect invasive aquatic species in water bodies of a region.
 New Methods Discovered to Detect Invasive Species in Water Bodies
New Methods Discovered to Detect Invasive Species in Water Bodies
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A new paper by a team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame's Environmental Change Initiative (ECI) demonstrates how two cutting-edge technologies can provide a sensitive and real-time solution to screening real-world water samples for invasive species before they cause significant damage, reports Science Daily.

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"Aquatic invasive species cause ecological and economic damage worldwide, including the loss of native biodiversity and damage to the world's great fisheries," Scott Egan, a research assistant professor with Notre Dame's Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics Initiative and a member of the research team, said.

"This research combines two new, but proven technologies, environmental DNA (eDNA) and Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS), to address the growing problem of aquatic invasive species by increasing our ability to detect dangerous species in samples before they arrive or when they are still rare in their environment and have not yet caused significant damage," Egan said.

Egan points out that eDNA is a species surveillance tool that recognises a unique advantage of aquatic sampling: water often contains microscopic bits of tissue in suspension, including the scales of fish, the exoskeletons of insects, and the sloughed cells of and tissues of aquatic species.

These tissue fragments can be filtered from water samples and then a standard DNA extraction is performed on the filtered matter. The new sampling method for invasive species was pioneered by members of the ND Environmental Change Initiative, including David Lodge and Chris Jerde, Central Michigan University's Andrew Mahon, and The Nature Conservancy's Lindsay Chadderton.

Source: IANS
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