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Mobile Breathalyzers Extend Reach of Outpatient Treatment for Alcohol-Use Disorders

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  June 27, 2016 at 6:02 PM Alcohol & Drug Abuse News   - G J E 4
Promising research looks at the feasibility, implementation, validity and utilization of mobile momentary-assessment breathalyzers within the context of an intensive outpatient (IOP) treatment for alcohol-use disorders (AUDs).
 Mobile Breathalyzers Extend Reach of Outpatient Treatment for Alcohol-Use Disorders
Mobile Breathalyzers Extend Reach of Outpatient Treatment for Alcohol-Use Disorders
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Alcohol treatment has come a long way from enforced isolation in asylums, and technological advancements are particularly promising in terms of their capacity to improve treatment effectiveness.

‘The feasibility, implementation, validity and utilization of mobile momentary-assessment breathalyzers within the context of an intensive outpatient (IOP) treatment for alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) shows promising results.’
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"Using ongoing monitoring in outpatient treatment brings treatment of AUDs closer to a classic disease management approach," said Adi Jaffe, co-founder and executive director of Alternatives Addiction Treatment. "Informing the public about these advances will drive the demand for better, more evidence-based treatment tools in the field, thereby improving overall outcomes and services in the industry."

Jaffe is also in charge of client monitoring, technology solutions, data collection, and outcomes research at Alternatives Addiction Treatment, and will present his research at the 39th Annual Research Society on Alcoholism in New Orleans June 25-29, 2016.

Jaffe and his co-researchers provided 56 participants in an IOP treatment program in Southern California with breathalyzers at the beginning of their program. Breathalyzer assessment schedules were set based on client's self-report of sleep schedules, and three to five assessments (M=4) per day were conducted remotely. Breathalyzer data were recorded for the duration of treatment, which lasted between two to six months (M=3.5 months). Participants were given a short survey to assess their satisfaction with the breathalyzer system. Data preparation and analysis was conducted post treatment.

Results support the use of emerging measurement technology to improve alcohol treatment. "The main contribution of our research is the introduction of methods that can help improve oversight and accountability within treatment without greatly increasing costs," said Jaffe. "Using technology can improve outcomes in treatment while reducing logistical limitations and cost-prohibitive treatment options."

Source: Newswise
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