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Loyola University Chicago Will Host Workshop on Giant Proteins Linked to Heart Disease

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  June 21, 2016 at 6:27 AM Heart Disease News   - G J E 4
Titin is an essential component of muscle. It's the largest protein in the body, weighing about 15 times as much as an average protein. In the heart, it acts like a spring, affecting the heart's ability to contract and relax. Normally when people age, the titin protein gets shorter. But in heart failure patients, the protein grows longer and becomes less effective.
 Loyola University Chicago Will Host Workshop on Giant Proteins Linked to Heart Disease
Loyola University Chicago Will Host Workshop on Giant Proteins Linked to Heart Disease
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Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) is critical for the normal functioning of striated muscles, including heart muscles. During a heart attack, cardiac MyBP-C breaks into pieces. This fragmentation coincides with damage to heart muscle and heart failure.

‘A workshop on the three giant proteins - titin, myosin binding protein C and obscurin - that play critical roles in heart disease will be hosted by Loyola University Chicago.’
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Obscurin is a muscle protein that's related to titin.

Loyola University Chicago is hosting a workshop on these three giant proteins that play critical roles in heart disease.

The conference will be held in the new state-of-the-art Center for Translational Research and Education on Loyola's Health Sciences Campus in Maywood, Illinois. Panel members and speakers will range from researchers just beginning in the field to senior scientists known worldwide for their research.

The conference, which is open to the media, is titled 'Titin and its binding partners, myosin binding protein-C and obscurin in health and disease'.

The workshop is organized by Sakthivel Sadayappan, associate professor in the department of cell and molecular physiology of Loyola University Chicago; Aikaterini Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, associate professor, University of Maryland; and Henk Granzier, professor, University of Arizona.

Source: Newswise
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