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Key Process That Allows Colon Cancer to Metastasize Discovered

by Sheela Philomena on  November 15, 2012 at 12:15 PM Cancer News   - G J E 4
Scientists have identified that the ability of colon cancer to metastasize lies in the healthy cells, called stroma. Stroma cells surround the tumour. Although the stroma has long been hypothesized to be complicit in this process, this study marks the first time that healthy cells in the microenvironment have been observed to play a fundamental role in allowing metastasis to occur in a specific tumour type.
 Key Process That Allows Colon Cancer to Metastasize Discovered
Key Process That Allows Colon Cancer to Metastasize Discovered
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The discovery, which will be tomorrow's Cancer Cell cover story, could translate into direct benefits for patients given that in a little more than five years, tests could be available to predict relapse allowing doctors to target treatment according to prognosis. IRB Barcelona Group Leader Eduard Batlle, ICREA researcher and recipient of an ERC Starting Grant and the Banco Sabadell Biomedical Research Prize, and Associate Researcher Elena Sancho, presented their results at a press conference held during the Barcelona BioMed Conference on "Normal and Tumour Stem Cells", organized by IRB Barcelona and the BBVA Foundation at the Institute d'Estudis Catalans.

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Tumour stem cells corrupt healthy cells in tumour microenvironmentBy studying 345 cases of colon cancer, using information in public databases and samples of patients provided by three hospitals in Barcelona, the team was able to identify the factors key to colon cancer metastasis. They showed that when tumour stem cells reach the liver, a common target of colon cancer metastasis, they release a molecule called TGF-beta into the microenvironment. The surrounding cells, including macrophages, leukocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, respond by releasing a different set of molecules. The researchers found that the cells in the tumour microenvironment produce interleukin-11 (IL11) and cause a series of genetic changes in the tumour stem cells that allow it to survive in the foreign organ.

"This study proposes a change in paradigm", explains Batlle. "Until now, if we wanted to know whether a colon cancer patient was likely to develop metastasis, we would look at their tumour cells. This study has shown us that, instead of looking at the seed, we need to be looking at the earth. We can predict if a plant will grow if the ground, or substrate, in which the seed is planted is fertilized. TGF-beta is the fertilizer that changes the earth in which the tumour seed grows."

The scientists also observed that tumour cells in the original organ already possess the ability to change their microenvironment. "We can tell whether there will be metastasis through indirect means. If we see that the stroma is already modified in the primary tumour site in the colon, it means that the tumour cells will also be able to change the microenvironment when they disseminate to the liver," explains Alexandre Calon, a French postdoctoral fellow in Batlle's lab and first author of the study.

A test to predict relapse ready in five yearsColon cancer is the second cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Current treatment normally combines surgery and chemotherapy. After intervention, patients normally go into remission, which can last months or years. 30-40% will relapse, mostly in the form of metastasis primarily to the liver or to the lung. Elena Sancho explains that "in about five years, we will likely have a test on the market that identifies those patients at risk of metastasis, allowing doctors to fine tune their treatment regimes."

The scientists have observed that about 15% of patients never develop metastasis and this is related to whether or not the stroma has been modified by TGF-beta. This means that armed with a diagnostic test that analyzes the genetic signature of the stroma (whether or not molecules including TGF-beta and interleukin-11 are present), doctors may be able to identify patients at risk of developing metastasis. If the data from this study are confirmed, between 10-15% of patients may no longer require chemotherapy, leading to direct benefits for their health and to a better use of resources. On the other hand, if the test predicts a high risk for metastasis, patients would be able to receive more aggressive treatment and undergo more thorough monitorization.

Source: Eurekalert
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