Inflammation - A Promising New Target for Treating Epilepsy Patients

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  July 7, 2016 at 9:26 AM Research News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent and unprovoked seizures. In epileptic patients, seizures lead to an increased level of inflammation-related proteins called chemokines in the brain, and systemic inflammation likely helps trigger and promote the recurrence of seizures, making inflammation a promising new target for anticonvulsant therapy.
 Inflammation - A Promising New Target for Treating Epilepsy Patients
Inflammation - A Promising New Target for Treating Epilepsy Patients

The latest evidence on one particular chemokine of interest, CCL2, and its potential role in human epilepsy are the focus of an article in DNA and Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

In 'Epilepsy, Seizures and Inflammation: Role of the CCL2 Chemokine', Yuri Bozzi, National Research Council, Pisa, and Matteo Caleo University of Trento, Italy, provide a comprehensive review of the research demonstrating the link between both systemic and brain inflammation and epileptic seizures. Based on established evidence that CCL2 mediates the seizure-promoting effects of inflammation, and that selectively blocking either the synthesis of CCL2 or its receptor in animal models of epilepsy suppresses inflammation-induced seizures, the researchers suggest that drugs already in for several human disorders that interfere with CCL2 signaling might be effective for treating epilepsy that is not controlled with current therapies.

"The targeted therapeutic approach to attack recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site of neuronal hyperactivity by preventing the chemoattractant molecule CCL2 from recruiting circulating cells is very promising," says Carol Shoshkes Reiss, Editor-in-Chief, of DNA and Cell Biology and Professor, Departments of Biology and Neural Science, and Global Public Health at New York University, NY. "I hope these studies can be translated from the bench to the bedside."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Related Links

More News on:

Epilepsy Febrile Fits / Febrile Convulsions Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Reye’s Syndrome Convulsions Anti-Inflammatory Diet Electroencephalogram Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome Cavernous Malformation Dravet Syndrome 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive