Immune System Molecule Promotes Tumor Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy: Scientists

by Rukmani Krishna on  August 8, 2013 at 8:24 PM Research News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

A signaling protein involved in inflammation also promotes tumor resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy, finds a team of scientists, led by Napoleone Ferrara, MD.
 Immune System Molecule Promotes Tumor Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy: Scientists
Immune System Molecule Promotes Tumor Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy: Scientists

The findings by Ferrara - professor of pathology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and senior deputy director for basic science at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center - and colleagues at Genentech, a biotechnology firm based in South San Francisco, are published in the August 4 Advance Online Publication of the journal Nature Medicine.

Angiogenesis is a physiological process in which new blood vessels form from existing vessels. It is fundamental to early development and wound healing, but some cancer tumors exploit angiogenesis to promote blood vessel growth and fuel a tumor's transition from a benign to a malignant state.

In the late 1980s, Ferrara led efforts to identify a key gene (VEGF) involved in angiogenesis and subsequent development of the first drugs to block VEGF-mediated growth in a variety of cancers, among them lung, kidney, brain and colorectal. Researchers discovered, however, that similar to other therapies, VEGF-targeting drugs may lose effectiveness as tumors develop resistance, allowing cancers to recur.

The latest research highlights the role of interleukin-17 or IL-17, one of a family of signaling molecules called cytokines that are involved in the body's immune response. Ferrara and colleagues discovered that IL-17 signaling in tumor-infiltrating T cells, part of the body's adaptive immune response, encourages resistance to the VEGF-blockade in mouse models.

"Our work has the potential to have major translational and therapeutic relevance," said Ferrara. "By inhibiting the effects of IL-17 with monoclonal antibodies or other blockers, we can potentially improve the clinical efficacy of VEGF-targeting drugs."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

Immunisation Tumor Markers For Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis Myasthenia Gravis 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive