Human and Non-Primate Animal Brains Have Dedicated 'Voice Areas'

by Bidita Debnath on  February 22, 2014 at 10:48 PM Research News
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A study to compare brain function between humans and any nonprimate animal shows that dogs have dedicated voice areas in their brains, just like humans do.
 Human and Non-Primate Animal Brains Have Dedicated 'Voice Areas'
Human and Non-Primate Animal Brains Have Dedicated 'Voice Areas'

Dog brains, like those of people, are also sensitive to acoustic cues of emotion, according to a study in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on February 20.

The findings suggest that voice areas evolved at least 100 million years ago, the age of the last common ancestor of humans and dogs, the researchers say. It also offers new insight into humans' unique connection with our best friends in the animal kingdom and helps to explain the behavioral and neural mechanisms that made this alliance so effective for tens of thousands of years.

"Dogs and humans share a similar social environment," says Attila Andics of MTA-ELTE Comparative Ethology Research Group in Hungary. "Our findings suggest that they also use similar brain mechanisms to process social information. This may support the successfulness of vocal communication between the two species."

Source: Eurekalert

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