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How Losing the Five Key Senses can Affect Elderly

by Reshma Anand on  February 20, 2016 at 2:32 PM Senior Health News   - G J E 4
The key senses: vision, smell, hearing, touch, and taste are vital for humans. But aging can lead to losing these senses, resulting in several consequences such as cognitive decline, poor mental health and increased mortality. In a new study, researchers examined how often multisensory losses occur and what their impact on older adults might be.
How Losing the Five Key Senses can Affect Elderly
How Losing the Five Key Senses can Affect Elderly
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In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, University of Chicago researchers analyzed data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), a population-based study of adults ages 57-85. The study collected information about the participants' senses of vision, touch, smell, hearing, and taste. The participants were also asked to rate their physical health.

‘Older adults who lose more than one sense have a poorer quality of life and face challenges in interacting with other people.’
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The researchers reported several key findings:

  • 94 percent of the participants experienced loss in at least one of their senses; 67 percent had two or more sensory losses. Of those with multisensory losses, 65 percent had substantial loss in at least one of their senses, and 22 percent experienced substantial loss in two or more senses.
  • 74 percent of participants suffered impairment in their ability to taste, which was the most common sensory loss.
  • 38 percent of participants had a sense of touch that was "fair;" 32 percent said it was "poor."
  • 22 percent had smell impairment (19 percent fair/3 percent poor function).
  • 14 percent had corrected distance vision that was "fair;" 6 percent said it was "poor."
  • 13 percent rated their corrected hearing as "fair;" 5 percent said it was "poor."
Older age was linked to poorer function in all five senses; the largest differences were in hearing, vision, and smell. What's more, men had worse functioning for hearing, smell, and taste than did women--although men had better corrected vision than women. African Americans and Hispanics tended to have worse sensory function than Caucasians in all senses except hearing. Hispanics tended to have better function in taste than those from other groups.

The researchers said that losing more than one sense might explain why older adults report having a poorer quality of life and face challenges in interacting with other people and the world around them. The researchers suggested that further studies into multisensory loss hold promise for designing better programs to prevent or treat loss and to ease the suffering such losses cause.

Source: Eurekalert
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