HIV Antibody That Binds to Novel Target on Virus Discovered

by Sheela Philomena on  September 4, 2014 at 3:28 PM AIDS/HIV News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

A new vulnerability in the armor of HIV that a vaccine, other preventive regimen or treatment could exploit has been discovered by NIH scientists. The site straddles two proteins, gp41 and gp120, that jut out of the virus and augments other known places where broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) bind to HIV. This newly identified site on the viral spike is where a new antibody found by the scientists in an HIV-infected person binds to the virus. Called 35O22, the antibody prevents 62 percent of known HIV strains from infecting cells in the laboratory and is extremely potent, meaning even a relatively small amount of it can neutralize the virus.
 HIV Antibody That Binds to Novel Target on Virus Discovered
HIV Antibody That Binds to Novel Target on Virus Discovered

Following their discoveries, the scientists found that 35O22-like antibodies were common in a group of HIV-infected people whose blood contained antibodies that potently neutralized a broad array of HIV strains. According to the researchers, this suggests that it might be easier for a vaccine to elicit 35O22 than some other known bNAbs, which are less common.

Since 35O22 binds only to forms of the viral spike that closely resemble those that naturally appear on HIV, the scientists believe a vaccine that elicits 35O22-like antibodies would need to mimic the natural shape of the spike as closely as possible. This would require a different approach than that used in many previous experimental HIV vaccines, which have included just parts of the viral spike rather than a structure that looks like the entire native viral spike.

In addition, the researchers report, the HIV strains that 35O22 neutralizes complement strains neutralized by other bNAbs. This suggests that eliciting or combining 35O22 with a few other bNAbs in a vaccine or a prevention or treatment regimen could likely neutralize the vast majority of HIV strains found around the globe, according to the scientists.



Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Related Links

More News on:

Oral Health And AIDS Chicken Pox AIDS/HIV AIDS/HIV - Epidemiology AIDS/HIV - Clinical Features AIDS/HIV - Health Education AIDS/HIV - Prevention And Transmission AIDS / HIV - Treatment AIDS/HIV- Lab Tests and Faqs Shigellosis 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Advertisement
Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

Advertisement

News Category

News Archive