Stem Cells from Fat Cells May Help Reverse Aging

by Dr. Meenakshy Varier on  February 18, 2017 at 11:57 AM Health Watch
RSS Email Print This Page Comment
Font : A-A+

Highlights
  • Stem cells derived from variety of tissues are currently used in various anti-aging treatments.
  • But stem cells derived from human fat cells called adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are more stable that other cells.
  • This ASCs can make more proteins which gives them the ability to replicate and maintain their stability.
Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat called adipocytes are more stable than other cells and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments.
Stem Cells from Fat Cells May Help Reverse Aging
Stem Cells from Fat Cells May Help Reverse Aging

The findings are according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Stem cells are commonly derived from variety of tissues such as skin called fibroblasts are currently used in a variety of anti-aging treatments.

But the research team led by Ivona Percec found that stem cells collected directly from human fat called adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are more stable that other cells.

These findings can potentially open the door to new therapies for the prevention and treatment of aging-related diseases.

Method

The researchers developed a new model to study chronological aging of these cells.

Chronological aging shows the natural life cycle of the cells rather than unnaturally replicating or manipulating the cells multiple times in a lab.

Penn researchers developed a system to collect and store the cells to preserve them in their natural state without manipulating them thus making them available for this study.

The researchers found that adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can make more proteins which gives them the ability to replicate and maintain their stability.

These finding were found to be true in cells collected from patients of all ages.

"Our study shows these cells are very robust, even when they are collected from older patients," said Ivona Percec, MD, director of Basic Science Research in the Center for Human Appearance and the study's lead author.

This shows that these cells can be potentially used safely in the future, because they require minimal manipulation and maintenance.

"Unlike other adult human stem cells, the rate at which these ASCs multiply stays consistent with age," Percec said. "That means these cells could be far more stable and helpful as we continue to study natural aging."

Conclusion

More research is needed as ASCs are not currently approved for direct use by the Food and Drug Administration.

The next step in the research is to study how chromatin is regulated in ASCs by understanding how tightly the DNA is wound around proteins inside these cells and how this affects aging.

The more open the chromatin is, the more the traits affected by the genes inside will be expressed.

Percec said she hopes to find out how ASCs can maintain an open profile with aging.

The findings are published in the journal Stem Cells.

Reference

  1. Ivona Percec et al. Transcriptional and Cell Cycle Alterations Mark Aging of Primary Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells. Stem Cells ; (2017) DOI: 10.1002/stem.2592doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2017.01.023


Source: Medindia

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Related Links

More News on:

Cholesterol Stem Cells - Cord Blood Stem Cells - Fundamentals Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Genetics and Stem Cells Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Ageing and Sleep Cholesterol - The Enigma Chemical Liposuction Quiz on Weight Loss 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive