Resistance- Based Interval Training Exercise Highly Effective for Type 2 Diabetes

by Dr. Meenakshy Varier on  January 13, 2017 at 11:54 AM Health Watch
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Highlights
  • Individuals with type 2 diabetes are up to four times likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those without.
  • Study demonstrates that acute sessions of resistance-based exercise decreases cardiovascular risk associated with type 2 diabetes.
  • Resistance-based interval training exercise is a time-efficient and effective method with immediate effects.
One session of interval weight-training can decrease the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications.
Resistance- Based Interval Training Exercise Highly Effective for Type 2 Diabetes
Resistance- Based Interval Training Exercise Highly Effective for Type 2 Diabetes

The findings are based on a study by researchers from University of British Columbia (UBC) Okanagan campus.

The study demonstrates that in people with and without diabetes, a series of simple leg exercises, involving weights, can improve blood vessel function.

Improper function of blood vessel is an indicator of heart health and heart attack risk.

Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body either does not produce insulin or does not use the insulin produced.

Insulin is a hormone is necessary to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. It can sometimes lead to fatal consequences.

In Canada, in the year 2015, there were 3.4 million people living with diabetes and 5.7 million people living with prediabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association.

It is estimated that by 2025, the prevalence of diabetes will increase to 5 million people.

"Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than those without," says Jonathan Little, an assistant professor in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences at UBC Okanagan's campus, the study's senior researcher.

Study

For the study, researchers recruited 35 people who belonged to the similar age group and assigned them into one of the three groups.
  • 12 people with type 2 diabetes
  • 12 people who did not exercise
  • 11 people without type 2 diabetes who exercised regularly
Little and his research team then compared the effect of two types of interval training on the blood vessel function:
  • resistance interval that included leg press, extensions and lifts
  • cardiovascular interval exercised that included stationary bicycle
Each group performed a 20-minute exercise routine. This included a warm up and 7 one-minute, high-intensity efforts with a one-minute rest between each interval.

Resistance-Based Training

Resistance training includes exercising the muscles against an opposing force. The use of resistance increases the muscle strength and size.

During resistance training exercise, muscle fibers are broken down. The muscle fibers repair and grow stronger, in the following days, to meet the demands that have been placed on it.

In resistance training, rest days are equally important as the exercise itself.

Results

Resistance training was introduced to this group because it is relatively easy and can accommodate individuals who are new to exercising.

After completion of just one bout of exercise, there was significant improvement in blood vessel function.

"All exercisers showed greater blood vessel function improvement after the resistance-based interval training," says Monique Francois, a UBC graduate student and the co-author of the study. "However, this was most prominent in the Type 2 diabetes group."

"This study shows that resistance-based interval training exercise is a time-efficient and effective method with immediate effects." resistance-based interval training exercise is a time-efficient and effective method with immediate effects added.

"With further study, this information could provide a new, safe and cost-effective tool to help people manage their disease." Little added.

The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology and was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

References

  1. Everything You Need to Know About Resistance Training - (http://www.weightlossresources.co.uk/exercise/resistance-training.htm)
  2. Diabetes Statistics in Canada - (http://www.diabetes.ca/how-you-can-help/advocate/why-federal-leadership-is-essential/diabetes-statistics-in-canada)
  3. Jonathan Little. Resistance-based interval exercise acutely improves endothelial function in type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology ; (2016) DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00398.2016


Source: Medindia

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