Mechanism Of Drug Resistance In Common Breast Cancer Treatment Identified

Mechanism Of Drug Resistance In Common Breast Cancer Treatment Identified

by Julia Samuel on  March 21, 2017 at 3:01 PM Health Watch
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

Highlights
  • Breast cancer tumors are frequently treated with drugs to suppress estrogen receptor activity but 50% cases develop drug resistance.
  • Two immune system molecules may be key to the development of drug resistance in estrogen-driven breast cancers.
  • IL1β and TNFα turn on pathways that modify the actual shape of the estrogen receptor, facilitating drug resistance.
Estrogen hormone drives almost three quarters of all breast cancer tumors. Drug resistance builds up in half of the cases when these tumors are treated with drugs to suppress estrogen receptor activity.
Mechanism Of Drug Resistance In Common Breast Cancer Treatment Identified

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), the University of California (UC), San Diego and the University of Illinois have found that two immune system molecules may be key to the development of drug resistance in estrogen-driven breast cancers.

The two molecules which are cytokines called interleukin 1 beta (IL1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), had previously been linked to the spread of drug-resistant cancer, but scientists were unsure of the exact mechanisms that led these molecules to drive drug resistance.

IL1β and TNFα turn on pathways that modify the actual shape of the estrogen receptor. This phenomenon appears to drive resistance to the common anti-cancer drug tamoxifen.

"Cytokines change the shape of the estrogen receptor, and that change overrides the inhibitory effects of tamoxifen and leads to drug resistance," said TSRI Associate Professor Kendall Nettles. "These findings dramatically alter our understanding of the biological actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines in breast cancer cells."

Hormone Therapies For Drug Resistance

The way these cytokines alter the estrogen receptor are sufficient to induce growth of breast cancer cells in the absence of estrogen, precisely what happens when breast cancer is initially treated with an endocrine therapy like tamoxifen.

Scientists found that in addition to reversing tamoxifen suppression of growth, cytokine activation of the estrogen receptor also enhanced the invasive properties of a specific line of human breast cancer cells known as MCF-7, the most studied human breast cancer cell in in the world.

Using x-ray crystallography, Nettles and his colleagues developed an atomic snapshot of the estrogen receptor to show how these shape changes occur and how the process might be blocked. Nettles pointed out that both inflammation and immune cells are known causes of resistance, but if that inflammation can be blocked, resistance can be reduced or eliminated.

"These tumors can reprogram the immune cells to their advantage so that the cells become tumor supportive," Kettles said. "We think we can produce hormone therapies that can, in essence, re-reprogram the immune system or prevent it from altering the receptor in the first place, which is an obvious strategy for blocking these adverse effects. Importantly, our atomic snapshot of the receptor showed that the same mechanism can explain how Her2Neu or other growth promoting factors, as well as certain invasion and motility signals also cause resistance to anti-hormone therapies."

Reference
  1. Author name, Researchers discover key to drug resistance in common breast cancer treatment, Molecular Cell (2017).


Source: Medindia

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Related Links

More News on:

Women and Cancer Drug Toxicity Breast Biopsy Pagets disease of the breast Mastitis Cancer and Homeopathy Signature Drug Toxicity Breast Cancer Facts Cancer Facts Cancer 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

Facebook

News Category

News Archive