Red Wine may not Serve its Purpose in the Obese

by Dr. Nithin Jayan on  April 13, 2013 at 11:19 AM Health In Focus   - G J E 4
Overweight and obese persons do not get the much touted benefits of red wine. Resveratrol, a silent ingredient in red wine, grabbed international fame owing to its medical potential. People with diabetes, dementia and heart diseases are likely to be benefited from resveratrol. However, an abnormally high body mass index (BMI) doesn't qualify one to reap these benefits.
Red Wine may not Serve its Purpose in the Obese
Red Wine may not Serve its Purpose in the Obese

A landmark study done in Denmark found that obese persons who took 1,500 mg of resveratrol per day for four weeks were no different from those who didn't take supplements, in terms of the changes made to insulin levels, blood pressure, cholesterol and energy expenditure. This proves wrong the older claims. Various studies in animal models had previously confirmed the impact of the compound on aging, obesity and diabetes. Resveratrol activates cell proteins called sirtuins and promotes the production of mitochondria (the power houses of a cell). The impact on obese individuals has been challenged by the new study.

The potential benefits of the red wine ingredient have always raised eyebrows globally. The anti-ageing effect of resveratrol by activation of SIRT1 protein has been proved and disproved multiple times. While Konrad Howitz and David Sinclair of the Harvard Medical School cling on to the anti-ageing effects, Pfizer and Amgen have failed in proving these. Authorities like the Mayo Clinic confirmed the 'bad cholesterol' lowering (i.e. low density lipoprotein, LDL) effect of the compound. It may lower the diseases of blood vessels arising due to high cholesterol levels.

Only time can prove what the reality is, whether resveratrol actually serves well or is it just a hoax. Well for now, the latest finding advocates us to maintain a healthy weight so as to benefit from a glass of red wine.


Exploring the Promise of Resveratrol: Where Do We Go From Here? Jill P. Crandall and Nir Barzilaidoi:10.2337/db12-1788 Diabetes April 2013.

Source: Medindia

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