Medindia

X

Growth Hormone Analog Could Reduce the Risk of Fatty Liver Disease in HIV-infected Patients

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on  July 21, 2014 at 1:04 PM Research News   - G J E 4
Modest reduction in liver fat was seen in HIV patients having excess abdominal fat after they received a growth hormone releasing hormone analog for six months, a new study has found. Patients infected with HIV demonstrate a high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, estimated at 30 percent to 40 percent. The issue is being released early to coincide with the International AIDS Conference.
 Growth Hormone Analog Could Reduce the Risk of Fatty Liver Disease in HIV-infected Patients
Growth Hormone Analog Could Reduce the Risk of Fatty Liver Disease in HIV-infected Patients
Advertisement

In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, abdominal fat accumulation is associated with ectopic (out of place) fat accumulation in the liver. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may progress to end-stage liver disease and liver cancer. To date, there are no approved pharmacologic strategies to reduce liver fat. Tesamorelin specifically targets abdominal fat reduction but its effects on liver fat are unknown, according to background information in the article.

Advertisement
Takara L. Stanley, M.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues randomly assigned 50 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected men and women with abdominal fat accumulation to receive tesamorelin (n=28), or placebo (n=22), subcutaneously daily for 6 months.

The researchers found a modest but statistically significant decrease in liver fat with tesamorelin. Hepatic lipid to water percentage (a measure of liver fat), decreased in the tesamorelin group (median, -2.0 percent) compared with placebo (median, 0.9 percent). In addition, there was a significant reduction in abdominal fat: the average change was -9.9 percent with tesamorelin vs 6.6 percent with placebo.

"The decrease in liver fat in this study suggests that strategies to reduce visceral adiposity merit further investigation in HIV-infected patients with NAFLD, a condition for which there are no approved treatments. Importantly, NAFLD is associated with visceral adiposity and other metabolic abnormalities in HIV," the authors write.

"Further studies are needed to determine the clinical importance and long-term consequences of these findings."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All