Exon Skipping can Restore Normal Gene Expression and Protein Production in Muscular Dystrophy

by Kathy Jones on  January 17, 2013 at 6:39 PM Genetics & Stem Cells News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

The Human Gene Therapy journal has documented two innovative examples of a therapeutic approach, known as exon skipping, which bypasses a disease causing mutation in a gene to restore normal gene expression and protein production.
 Exon Skipping can Restore Normal Gene Expression and Protein Production in Muscular Dystrophy
Exon Skipping can Restore Normal Gene Expression and Protein Production in Muscular Dystrophy

The articles are available free on the Human Gene Therapy website.

Willem Hoogaars and a team of researchers from France, the Netherlands, Finland, and Germany evaluated a combination of an exon-skipping treatment delivered via an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector and a compound that inhibits myostatin signaling in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The dual treatments led to improved muscle force and a decrease in ineffective muscle contractions, as well as increased body weight, muscle mass, and muscle fiber size. They did not, however, improve the effects of each treatment given individually. The results are reported in the article " Combined Effect of AAV-U7-Induced Dystrophin Exon Skipping and Soluble Activin Type IIB Receptor in mdx Mice."

Francesca Gualandi and colleagues, University of Ferrara and University of Padua, Italy, used exon skipping to inactivate mutated RNA messages responsible for defective collagen structure and function in muscle tissue affected by Ullrich muscular dystrophy or Bethlem myopathy. The authors describe their approach in "Antisense-Induced Messenger Depletion Corrects a COL6A2 Dominant Mutation in Ullrich Myopathy."

"This combines two very promising therapeutic approaches in a relevant animal model of muscular dystrophy," says James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, and Director of the Gene Therapy Program, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.



Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

More News on:

DNA Finger Printing Muscular Dystrophy Magical Millets for Your Health The Basics of Baby Food Weaver Syndrome Diet and Nutrition Tips for Athletes Nutrition IQ 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive

Loading...