Medindia

X

Ever-Youthful Life of Naked Mole Rats Bared

by Nancy Needhima on  May 15, 2012 at 3:43 PM General Health News   - G J E 4
An indication probably causes naked mole rats to live longer and healthy life, discovered by scientists.

The typical East African rodent live 25 to 30 years, during which it shows little decline in activity, bone health, reproductive capacity and cognitive ability.
 Ever-Youthful Life of Naked Mole Rats Bared
Ever-Youthful Life of Naked Mole Rats Bared
Advertisement

From infancy to old age, naked mole rats are blessed with large amounts of a protein essential for normal brain function, according to the team from the United States and Israel.

Advertisement
"Naked mole rats have the highest level of a growth factor called NRG-1 in the cerebellum. Its levels are sustained throughout their life, from development through adulthood," said Yael Edrey, doctoral student at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio's Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies.

Edrey is the lead author of research that compared lifelong NRG-1 levels across seven species of rodents, from mice and guinea pigs to blind mole rats and Damaraland mole rats.

NRG-1 levels were monitored in naked mole rats at different ages ranging from 1 day to 26 years. The other six rodent species have maximum life spans of three to 19 years.

The cerebellum coordinates movements and maintains bodily equilibrium. The research team hypothesized that long-lived species would maintain higher levels of NRG-1 in this region of the brain, with simultaneous healthy activity levels.

Among each of the species, the longest-lived members exhibited the highest lifelong levels of NRG-1. The naked mole rat had the most robust and enduring supply.

"In both mice and in humans, NRG-1 levels go down with age," Edrey said.

Researchers have documented various characteristics of naked mole rat physiology, revealing the integrity of proteins in the liver, kidney and muscle. This is the first set of data evaluating species' differences in a key factor involved in maintaining the integrity of the rodent's brain.

"The strong correlation between this protective brain factor and maximum life span highlights a new focus for aging research, further supporting earlier findings that it is not the amount of oxidative damage an organism encounters that determines species life span but rather that the protective mechanisms may be more important," said senior author Rochelle Buffenstein, Ph.D., professor of physiology and cellular and structural biology at the Barshop Institute. She is Edrey's research mentor.

The finding, while not directly applicable to humans, has many implications for NRG-1's role in maintaining neuron integrity.

The study has been described in an issue of Aging Cell.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

Advertisement
View All