Erratic Sleep Patterns Increase Risk of Obesity and Diabetes

by Kathy Jones on  April 12, 2012 at 8:27 PM Lifestyle News
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A new study conducted by researchers in Boston has revealed that the risk of diabetes and obesity is higher among those who have less than optimum sleep or erratic sleep.
 Erratic Sleep Patterns Increase Risk of Obesity and Diabetes
Erratic Sleep Patterns Increase Risk of Obesity and Diabetes

The study was conducted by researchers from the Brigham and Women's Hospital and involved 21 healthy volunteers over a period of six weeks. The participants managed to get an optimal 10 hours of sleep at the start and end of the study but for three weeks, they were made to sleep at different times of the day and for just five and a half hours.

The researchers found that erratic sleeping pattern and less hours of sleep had a negative effect on the metabolic rate, increasing the blood sugar levels due to poor insulin secretion by the pancreas.

Writing in the report, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the researchers said, "We think these results support the findings from studies showing that, in people with a pre-diabetic condition, shift workers who stay awake at night are much more likely to progress to full-on diabetes than day workers."



Source: Medindia

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