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DNA Powered Nanomachine Detects Bacteria With Greater Sensitivity

by Reshma Anand on  July 7, 2016 at 11:30 AM Research News   - G J E 4
DNA acts as the important agent in driving a microscopic machine to detect various substances ranging from viruses, bacteria to metals and illegal drugs.
DNA Powered Nanomachine Detects Bacteria With Greater Sensitivity
DNA Powered Nanomachine Detects Bacteria With Greater Sensitivity
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"It's a completely new platform that can be adapted to many kinds of uses," says John Brennan, director of McMaster's Biointerfaces Insitute and co-author of a paper in the journal Nature Communications that describes the technology. "These DNA nano-architectures are adaptable, so that any target should be detectable."

‘McMaster university researchers have developed the very first DNA-based nanomachine that is capable of achieving ultra-sensitive detection of a bacterial pathogen.’
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DNA is best known as a genetic material, but is also a very programmable molecule that lends itself to engineering for synthetic applications.

The new method shapes separately programmed pieces of DNA material into pairs of interlocking circles.

The first remains inactive until it is released by the second, like a bicycle wheel in a lock. When the second circle, acting as the lock, is exposed to even a trace of the target substance, it opens, freeing the first circle of DNA, which replicates quickly and creates a signal, such as a color change.

"The key is that it's selectively triggered by whatever we want to detect," says Brennan, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Bioanalytical Chemistry and Biointerfaces. "We have essentially taken a piece of DNA and forced it to do something it was never designed to do. We can design the lock to be specific to a certain key. All the parts are made of DNA, and ultimately that key is defined by how we build it."

The idea for the "DNA nanomachine" comes from nature itself, explains co-author Yingfu Li, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Nucleic Acids Research.

"Biology uses all kinds of nanoscale molecular machines to achieve important functions in cells," Li says. "For the first time, we have designed a DNA-based nano-machine that is capable of achieving ultra-sensitive detection of a bacterial pathogen."

The DNA-based nanomachine is being further developed into a user-friendly detection kit that will enable rapid testing of a variety of substances, and could move to clinical testing within a year.



Source: Eurekalert
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