Differences in Brains of Preterm Infants Shown by MR Spectroscopy

by Rukmani Krishna on  November 30, 2013 at 11:52 PM Child Health News   - G J E 4
A study finds that premature birth appears to trigger developmental processes in the white matter of the brain that could put children at higher risk of problems later in life. The study is being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
 Differences in Brains of Preterm Infants Shown by MR Spectroscopy
Differences in Brains of Preterm Infants Shown by MR Spectroscopy

Preterm infants—generally those born 23 to 36 weeks after conception, as opposed to the normal 37- to 42-week gestation—face an increased risk of behavioral problems, ranging from impulsiveness and distractibility to more serious conditions like autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

"In the United States, we have approximately 500,000 preterm births a year," said Stefan Blüml, Ph.D., director of the New Imaging Technology Lab at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and associate professor of research radiology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. "About 60,000 of these babies are at high risk for significant long-term problems, which means that this is a significant problem with enormous costs."

Dr. Blüml and colleagues have been studying preterm infants to learn more about how premature birth might cause changes in brain structure that may be associated with clinical problems observed later in life. Much of the focus has been on the brain's white matter, which transmits signals and enables communication between different parts of the brain. While some white matter damage is readily apparent on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Dr. Blüml's group has been using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at differences on a microscopic level.

In this study, the researchers compared the concentrations of certain chemicals associated with mature white matter and gray matter in 51 full-term and 30 preterm infants. The study group had normal structural MRI findings, but MRS results showed significant differences in the biochemical maturation of white matter between the term and preterm infants, suggesting a disruption in the timing and synchronization of white and gray matter maturation. Gray matter is the part of the brain that processes and sends out signals.

"The road map of brain development is disturbed in these premature kids," Dr. Blüml said. "White matter development had an early start and was 'out of sync' with gray matter development."

Source: Eurekalert

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