Delayed and Misdiagnosis of Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt Disease

by Bidita Debnath on  September 25, 2012 at 1:24 PM Research News   - G J E 4
A correct diagnosis is often delayed with patients suffering from degenerative brain disorder sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease (sCJD), reveals medical records of 97 patients.
 Delayed and Misdiagnosis of Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt Disease
Delayed and Misdiagnosis of Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt Disease

The disease is often misdiagnosed because of a variability of early symptoms and signs, a variability in disease duration and a lack of recognition of the condition in the medical community. Often, sCJD is mistaken for other neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, according to the study background.

Ross W. Paterson, M.R.C.P., and colleagues from the University of California, San Francisco, retrospectively reviewed all cases referred to the UCSF Memory and Aging Center rapidly progressing dementia and CJD clinical research program between August 2001 and February 2007. They identified 97 patients with pathology-proven sCJD for whom they had sufficient medical records (40 women and 57 men who ranged in age from 26 to 83 years).

The 97 patients had received a combined total of 373 alternative diagnoses prior to their diagnosis of likely CJD, with an average of 3.8 misdiagnoses per patient. The physicians who most commonly made the misdiagnoses were primary care physicians and neurologists. In the 18 percent of patients (17 patients) who were correctly diagnosed at their first assessment, the diagnosis was almost always made by a neurologist. The average time from onset to diagnosis was almost eight months, an average of two-thirds the way through the disease course, according to the study results.

"In any patient with a rapidly progressive dementia who has been given multiple potential diagnoses, sCJD must be considered," the authors comment.

Researchers note that "early and accurate" diagnosis of sCJD is valuable for public health reasons and to allow for potential treatments to be tested as early as possible in the disease course.

"It would therefore be valuable to improve early and accurate diagnosis of sCJD premortem to identify at-risk persons, allowing for public health measures that would prevent transmission to healthy individuals through blood donation, infected surgical equipment and or other medical procedures," the authors conclude.

Source: Eurekalert

Post your Comments

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
User Avatar
* Your comment can be maximum of 2500 characters
Notify me when reply is posted I agree to the terms and conditions

You May Also Like

View All